Tag Archives: horror

FREE Sale Ends TODAY!!!

Until midnight, you have the chance to pick up the first part of my Post-Apocalypse/Sci-Fi series Meet Me at the Falls for FREE! Yes, you can join the THOUSANDS of people who already downloaded the book today and catch up for less than the cup of coffee you’ll drink while reading it. It may even taste better (especially if it’s Charbucks).

After two years of writing, it’s been incredibly rewarding to see people going nuts downloading the book.So far the response has been incredible–with over a thousand downloads so far and we’ve climbed the ranks to become #1 in several categories and today, the second day of our FREE SALE, we are at the Top 300 spot in the Kindle Store.

We owe all of our success to YOU. As much as it is a personal journey for us, we’re writing this story for you, our loyal fans who have seen us through many adventures. Today, we invite you along for the ride totally FREE.

If you like the book, please let us know in the Amazon reviews section, and tell your friends and family about it. We’re self-published and have to do everything ourselves–especially marketing. The best way for us to share these great stories is actually through you…through word of mouth…Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, Amazon, Goodreads or whatever you use. We truly appreciate any help and support, which again is why we’re making the book FREE for you today.

We spent an entire year of writing and editing Part 3, because we wanted it to really shine and be worth the wait. Part one is FREE today, so anyone can discover The Falls.

THANK YOU… Seriously and sincerely :’)

FREE SALE ends TONIGHT, so hurry on over to Amazon and download your copy today!

Part Two and Part Three are out now, and we wanted to make those just 99 cents as well!

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Meet Me At The Falls Part 3, Pre-Order!

The wait is over. You can now pre-order your copy of Meet Me at the Falls, Part 3 (Submersion) before it’s released to the public on Amazon.com. By ordering now, Amazon will deliver the story to your Kindle or other reading device at midnight. It’ll be like Christmas, enjoying good reading hot off the press with your morning cup of coffee.

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PRE-ORDER NOW!

The story picks up right where Part Two left off. If you need to catch up, grab yourself a copy today here. The Murphy family continue their hard journey to the Falls, but each of them couldn’t be further away. All the set-up from parts one and two are exploding into action, starting with The Kids, caught up in the middle of a blood-bath on the freeways outside of Seattle. Alan finds himself lured by the questionably mad Doctor Belmond, the Mother faces the bitter cold of the wild and the harder decisions she faces, and Wiley waits for his family–already at the Falls, but ensnared by a Native American dreamcatcher.

Curious to see where Alan is running in the stunning new cover? Or what he may be running from? Find out now!

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Meet Me at the Falls – Part Two!

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The wait is over! “Meet Me at the Falls – Part 2” is now for sale on Amazon. We have boldly taken the next step in our dystopian adventure together. Each of us wrote our sections separate from each other, Zack in San Francisco, myself in Los Angeles, and Ben … wherever he is around the globe. In that way we are just like the Murphy’s, separated by hundreds of miles yet all striving to reach the Falls.

Part 1 – The End” found the Murphy family separated, lost and struggling to survive in a post-apocalyptic America after a global cataclysm. They hoped the other family members were heading toward their old campsite at Snoqualmie Falls near Seattle, but don’t realize everyone has been derailed. The Father, Alan, encountered a cult who tried to use him in some ritual surrounding the supernatural phenomenon in the sky. The Kids, Edwin and Tricia, ran for their lives from “The Roar,” a relentless black swarm—something between monster and machine. The Mother, Charlotte, met a helpless young man who sacrificed himself to save her from the lethal cold. The Son, Wiley, accidentally killed a bear, only to arrive at the Falls with no sign of his family. Either he is just the first to arrive…or the only one to survive.

Now… “Part 2 – Reclamation” finds the world crumbling beneath the Murphy family’s feet as the mystery surrounding what caused the apocalypse deepens. Each member of the family encounters new survivors attempting to recover what they’ve lost—or kill each other trying. As the Murphys continue their trek toward the Falls, everyone and everything stands in their way.

I’m proud to say that ‘Part 2’ is officially a novella, weighing in at 22,320 words (81 pages)! It’s been quite the adventure for we three writers as it has the Murphy family, still struggling to meet up at the Falls. Zack Keller, Ben Tuller and I are very excited for you to see what happens next!

Click here to read “Meet Me At The Falls (Part 2 – Reclamation).”

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“Meet Me at the Falls” on Indie Author Land

Screen shot 2013-10-23 at 11.58.15 AMThe good folks over at Indie Author Land have created a dedicated hub for self-published authors, geared toward you: the reader. It’s a great place to find new up and coming talent and honestly just great and daring fiction. The whole site is run by a lovely couple, a journalist covering the arts and a computer programmer; both avid readers with a passion to help spread the word about good fiction. Plain and simple. Their slogan says it all: Great Books. No Middleman.

As they mention, their ‘site is growing, and that’s what they want. The idea is for their growth to be organic and fluid, growing to fill whatever void it may come across.’ Sounds like what it feels to look at a blank page with a pencil in your hand.

Admittedly, their site is also a selfish means to find their next favorite book. Their latest favorite pick comes from the self-publishing trio at Pen, Pint & Pyre: “Meet Me at the Falls“, the Sci-Fi Thriller by authors Ben Tuller, Zack Keller and myself.

Check out the interview with the authors, and the rest of their site here: http://www.indieauthorland.com/archives/5903

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New Sci-Fi Serial: Meet Me at the Falls

Meet Me at the Falls

Post Apocalyptic, Sci-Fi and Horror fans alike, I’m pleased to announce the release of Pen, Pint & Pyre‘s fourth publication, Meet Me at the Falls — the first chapter in a five-part short series by authors Zack Keller, Ben Tuller and myself.

We wanted to take an idea, each write part of it, focusing on one characters and then tie the stories together in one cohesive narrative. The result was something more exciting and richer than any one of us could have imagined alone.

The story follows the Murphy family as they fight their way through hell and back again after the world has fallen apart. Planning for the impossible, they had decided that if anything like this ever happened, they all agreed to do one thing: Meet Me at the Falls

Available Now on Amazon.com for just $0.99

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Campfire Language

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Despite the fancy phrasing and tickled sentences, all massaged and beefed up till they’re practically poetry, most of the language in some of the greatest books is ordinary and plain. And it should be. Why?

Clarity

Complex sentences can be beautiful, but hard to digest and it’s exhausting if the entire novel is written that way. For a select few authors born with a gilded tongue, they can create a feast for the eyes of the reader. But most of the time readers want clarity. It’s easy to overwork a sentence until it’s the best thing you’ve ever written. But is it really serving its purpose? The story is what should be engaging — the characters and how they interact and react with each other and the problems they face. And the funny thing is, you’ll remember a book as having been much more elaborate and painted than it actually was.

Tell your stories aloud to a friend, to yourself, to your dog. If it starts sounding verbose and awkward to spit out … if you can hear yourself getting bored, eyes glassing over at the detailed descriptions … STOP. Re-write it like you were standing around a campfire, keeping everyone engaged. Your friend’s grandfather should be as interested as your ten-year-old nephew.

Walt Disney had a rule when he would pitch ideas around the studio. The moment someone looked away when he was telling them a story he knew he had lost them. He would often start over, changing the story on the fly for the next person he told, or finding a better way to say the same thing. Pitch your ideas to someone. Part of it, of course, has to do with how engaging your material is — but a lot of it is just the language. The simple way that you speak/write. It’s important to discover what keeps people engaged. Suck up your pride and experiment with that.

The Power of 2+2 in Description

Stories build on each other. What’s true for film should remain true for a novel. There are really never too many “complex” moments in stories. Any complexity comes from many little–but meaningful–instances peppered throughout the story. 

Whenever I start a new project, or if I’m stuck on some phrasing I’m not totally pleased with, I’ll turn to my dozen or so favorite novels for some re-inspiration. I was working on my latest book Wonderful World of Zombies and really felt that this one description was lacking that vivid detail I remembered from books like Crichton’s Jurassic Park. There’s a part that they cut from the movie (though, Spielberg added it in to the second film) where the kids are hiding behind a waterfall from the T-Rex. I remember the scene vividly in my mind.

“Timmy and Lex were shivering with fear behind the roar of the waterfall when suddenly, the Rex let out a bellowing roar as his giant head came crashing through the thundering veil of falling water with tremendous force in hot pursuit of the children.”

I’m sure some of you might remember this too, right? Wrong. Here’s how the text actually went:

“And then, with a roar, the tyrannosaur’s head burst through the waterfall toward them.”

That … that was it?! I thumbed through the rest of the book at random, just to see if my mind was playing tricks on me. Surely this was an isolated event.

Nope. All over the book, I found nothing but short, simple and concise phrasing with one or two very select descriptors attached to very plain language. At first I was so disappointed.

“The room was filled with yellow stones.” … ” It scurried into the underbrush, dragging a fat tail. ” … “The raptor snarled in frustration, twenty feet above him on the catwalk” … “Tim felt rain”

You’ve gotta be kidding me. It was so plain. So ordinary. And it wasn’t just Crichton. I found instances in Hemingway, Tolkien, J.K. Rowling, Stephen King, Dan Brown and more. 

Then, I realized why. When an author allows the reader to digest the story so quickly without getting caught up on how beautiful the words are, the result is 2+2=4. Just as John Hammond used frog DNA, the reader fills in the gaps in their mind and takes away the lasting memory of how the scene felt. In the end that’s all that matters. I remember one instance in particular in Brown’s The Lost Symbol, where the room was described as having “an impressive array of technology.” That’s really all you need. The right, simple adjective and the subject. People tell their friends about a book because “Oh man, it’s so scary. You have to read it!”

The phrase “Tim felt rain,” has become a staple among my fellow authors and writing partners. It’s a reminder to both go easy on the verbiage, but also to remember to let the story happen to your characters. But, we’ll save that topic for another discussion.

Everyday Language

I was also shocked at how many sentences started off with “and”, “but”, “so”, and any number of other conjunctions we were taught to be grammatically incorrect at the start of a sentence. I remember so much red on my homework. It was bad writing. It wasn’t proper English. It was wrong! Yet in so many highly regarded novels … there it was. How did they get away with that? Surely they flunked out of Creative Writing.

But no, when you talk to someone in person you don’t speak that way at all. And often times you’ll continue a thought in the next sentence, tacking it on to what would be considered a grammatically finished statement. So don’t be afraid of writing it the same way on the page …. See? Screw proper English!

It can be pretentious to speak so god damned properly all the time. Most of the time, you’re not going to impress your audience with overly-descriptive language and incredibly witty phrasing. There’s certainly a time and place to do that, and one should strive to say things in a fresh and unique fashion — but you’re not Faulkner. In response to such criticism, Hemingway once noted:

“Poor Faulkner. Does he really think big emotions come from big words? He thinks I don’t know the ten-dollar words. I know them all right. But there are older and simpler and better words, and those are the ones I use.” —Ernest Hemingway, Quoted in: A.E. Hotchner, Papa Hemingway

It’s not to say the sentences like, “The raptors were snarling at Arnold when the animal on the left simply exploded, the upper part of the torso flying into the air, blood spattering like a burst tomato on the walls of the building,” shouldn’t be included. Because they should. And they are great. But they are few. Authors should remember to include language people understand and are used to hearing spoken out loud. Among friends. At a lecture. As if you’re sitting around a campfire with friends, family and strangers who all want to hear the tale you have to tell.

Some of the most memorable lines in history are some of the simplest and direct, deriving great meaning from their implication, and no more than three letters long.

“To be or not to be…”

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